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20121217
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know we all saw this. this is what we used to call the topic sentence. i think this was the most telling action oriented piece of what the president said last night up in connecticut. let's listen to it now. >> in the coming weeks i will use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. because what choice do we have? we can't accept events like this as routine. are we really prepared to say that we're powerless in the face of such carnage? that the politics are too hard? are we prepared to say that such violence visited on our children year after year after year is somehow the price of our freedom? >> chuck todd, you know, gun control was probably not in many politicians' song book going into this coming year but now it is. reality, reality checks, reality bites. do you think the president has given any sign he will do something about gun safety in this next term? >> well, if he wants to -- that speech was a powerful speech, it w
, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. she said she would introduce new legislation soon. senator di
to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them
" magazine edward lindgren. jansing and company's chris jansing joins us now. you have been on the road a lot this year to some very terrible places in the wake of some very serious american tragedies, but this one, if i dare say it, seems a little bit different. give us your sense of your take on the move -- as far as the mood on the ground and how the community is reacting m days since the tragedy. >> alex, it would be difficult to even begin to try to express the depth and the breadth of the pain that this community is feeling and will feel all weeklong. the first of a series of funerals is getting underway right now. i'll show you a page from the local paper, and there are two pages of obituaries of children. we've just learned that governor dan malloy has shown up at the funeral of little noah, 6 years old, noah posner, who has a twin and an 8-year-old sister, and there was a heartbreaking question asked in his obituary. how do you capture the essence of a 6-year-old in just a few words? when i first came here on friday, alex, i was talking to the local priest. they lost ten young parish
demint told us he would not continue. this is a foundation for i have always been excited for. in this decision and process we went through comment there is no replacing jim demint. is no one that can fill his shoes. there's no one that can carry on that torch. i think that says a lot about him is as a lot about how he has changed the basis of carolina. this is a new day. it is with great pleasure that i am announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause] many people have asked what went into this decision process and it was simple. he understands the strength need to have as we continue to focus on jobs. he has shown that with his support knowing the deepening needs to be there. he has shown courage with this fiscal representation. he knows the value of a dollar. he understands what every family in small business goes through. it also shows that this man of south carolina. he is very aware that what he does and every vote he makes a backstop carolina and our country. it is with that that i knew he was the right person. they unders
that the ideas are not working. they're dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready, not with political ideas but with american ideas, ideas that we know are working and can point to and show that they're working for 100% of americans. that's what i'm going to be doing the next few years. i'm not getting out of the fight. i'm raising my game. i know that i have got a partner now in tim scott as well as lindsey graham and governor haley and all of you that are here today. i am so grateful for the opportunity to serve. i promise you and i'm going to keep serving and fighting in the same way that you have seen in the past. thank you. [applause] >> and i can tell you that one of the things as i travel across the country, everyone always wants to know how in the world we got the best federal delegation in the country. all i tell them is that south carolina is blessed. we have a great group of legislators that fight every day, that get what we want and they fight for it. they just
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
there, and they are analyzing that to see what they can get out of it. >> what can you tell us about what happened if what was the scenario? >> well, it all starts friday morning when he takes his mother's guns. she had purchased them legally. this is a woman who grew up in rural new hampshire, comfortable with guns, collected them. he killed her. takes three of the guns to the school. drives there in her car. forces his way in, apparently by shattering a window. they had a buzzer system. he forced his way in. the principal and the school psychologist tried to stop him. he killed them. and then concentrated his firepower on two classrooms with devastating effect. and, david, the detail that was show sho so shocking is he used an assault-style weapon. a term that bothers some people. but a bushmaster 223, the same weapon that the washington snipers used 10 years ago, and shot these children several times, some as many as 10 and 11 times. so you can only imagine the devastating effect that that had. >> the shooter, adam lanza, who took his own life. we have an older picture of him, the
trouble. >> host: what was one of the cases, walk us through. >> guest: an interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and began playing anti-catholic records on portable phonographs and distributing literature, and they were arrested for disturbing the peace and preaching without a permit, and appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said that because connecticut said, well, individual city administrators would decide what a valid program was for religious organizations and would allow them or not on to the streets, they said that allows too much discretion by the state government, and they applied for the first time part of that first amendment, this time, the free exercise clause, as against the state of connecticut, and overturned their law that allowed city officials to license or not as they saw fit. >> host: and did that lead to any nationwide movements, or was it a well publicized case at the time? >> guest: it was a relatively well publicized
in the u.s.? >> guest: well, one of the issues that i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended, and the geographical reach of slavery. i think the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century, certainly, a country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave state, and, of course, the civil war growing out of that conflict. my issue is not whether slavery's at the root of the civil war, which it certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states, and the later emancipation of slaves much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th century, and gradually, northern states and northeast and mid an lat tick states began to abolish slavely, but i learned it was a gradual process. it took a long time. what we discoveredded there were laves in new jersey in 1860, and most of the states that abolished slavery between 1780 and 1804, the period we customarily looked at, ha
of tomorrow's only broadband and not broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we begin part of discussions on the future of television. he is the president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. >> guest: thank you. >> host: and ted gotsch of "telecommunications report," thank you b the for being on "the communicators." >> thanks for having me. >> just ahead, the first of two forums from a recent conference examining the 201 2 elections with jeremy byrd. then two secretaries of state discuss the impact of voter id laws. after that we're hive from the brookings institution on the future of egypt following it constitutional refer dumb, and later another live forum examining a proposal to raise medicare's eligibility age. >> also today a discussion with some of the leaders who have helped create what's known as e-government. this month marks the tenth anniversary of the act that was helped to allow federal agencies to deliver information for mishtly using the -- efficiently using the internet. you can see live coverage beginning at 9 a.m. eastern o
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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